Bari Sardo: what to see

Discover what to see in Bari Sardo. Explore the routes through art, monuments and archaeology in Ogliastra.

Of course, Bari Sardo is famous for its beaches and is also, given its location, an ideal crossroads for discovering the infinite wonders of Ogliastra.
But this territory is much more than its sea.
It is, in fact, the unexpected details, the sudden glimpses and the off-route detours that make up the best memories of a holiday.
Perhaps it is that the beauty of travelling predisposes us to the pleasure of discovery, and we happily encounter the unexpected.
Here, then, are some useful pointers to help you find your way around an area full of surprises that, for a moment, will make you forget the wonder of its beaches.

La Torre Spagnola

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One cannot tell the story of Bari Sardo without talking about its most identifying symbol: the Tower (la Torre). This now iconic place has been a fixed point in the imagination of this coastline for almost 500 years.
Slender towards the sky, the tower projects itself towards the horizon and looks far into the distance. A place of the soul for the local community, it guards the shoreline, conveying security and tranquillity.
It was built at the end of the 16th century, a period of Spanish rule in Sardinia, on the orders of the captain of Iglesias, Marco Antonio Camos. He had identified this site as being too heavily frequented by Saracen pirates.

It was then built on a stretch of coastline, known to sailors as Punta Nera. This site provided a visual connection with two other towers: Capo Bellavista to the north and San Giovanni di Sarrala to the south.
From the 5th to the 19th century, Sardinia was, in fact, equipped with an articulated sighting system that provided for the erection of towers communicating with one another along its entire perimeter. Communications thus took place through a pre-established code using light and sound signals.
Today, it is possible to rediscover this enormous historical and scenic heritage through the famous 100 Towers Walk—1284 kilometres, divided into eight stages, winding through trekking, hiking, camping and cycling routes.

The Tower had an additional defence function. It was constantly guarded by a commander, an artilleryman and two soldiers, who had at their disposal seven rifles, a pusher and no less than two cannons still preserved at the foot of the building.
The scene of violent battles and witness to a stormy past, today the Torre di Barì has become one of the most photographed places on the coast and an evocative setting for music festivals, theatre, and augmented reality shows.
A destination for relaxing evening strolls, it provides a scenic backdrop to a breathtaking panorama at night.

Expand your perspective in 360°

Immergiti

Bari Sardo: what to see

Discover what to see in Bari Sardo. Explore the routes through art, monuments and archaeology in Ogliastra.

Of course, Bari Sardo is famous for its beaches and is also, given its location, an ideal crossroads for discovering the infinite wonders of Ogliastra.
But this territory is much more than its sea.
It is, in fact, the unexpected details, the sudden glimpses and the off-route detours that make up the best memories of a holiday.
Perhaps it is that the beauty of travelling predisposes us to the pleasure of discovery, and we happily encounter the unexpected.
Here, then, are some useful pointers to help you find your way around an area full of surprises that, for a moment, will make you forget the wonder of its beaches.

The Spanish Tower

Dove dormire
Dove mangiare
vai alla mappa

One cannot tell the story of Bari Sardo without talking about its most identifying symbol: the Tower (la Torre). This now iconic place has been a fixed point in the imagination of this coastline for almost 500 years.
Slender towards the sky, the tower projects itself towards the horizon and looks far into the distance. A place of the soul for the local community, it guards the shoreline, conveying security and tranquillity.
It was built at the end of the 16th century, a period of Spanish rule in Sardinia, on the orders of the captain of Iglesias, Marco Antonio Camos. He had identified this site as being too heavily frequented by Saracen pirates.

It was then built on a stretch of coastline, known to sailors as Punta Nera. This site provided a visual connection with two other towers: Capo Bellavista to the north and San Giovanni di Sarrala to the south.
From the 5th to the 19th century, Sardinia was, in fact, equipped with an articulated sighting system that provided for the erection of towers communicating with one another along its entire perimeter. Communications thus took place through a pre-established code using light and sound signals.
Today, it is possible to rediscover this enormous historical and scenic heritage through the famous 100 Towers Walk—1284 kilometres, divided into eight stages, winding through trekking, hiking, camping and cycling routes.

The Tower had an additional defence function. It was constantly guarded by a commander, an artilleryman and two soldiers, who had at their disposal seven rifles, a pusher and no less than two cannons still preserved at the foot of the building.
The scene of violent battles and witness to a stormy past, today the Torre di Barì has become one of the most photographed places on the coast and an evocative setting for music festivals, theatre, and augmented reality shows.
A destination for relaxing evening strolls, it provides a scenic backdrop to a breathtaking panorama at night.

Expand your perspective in 360°

Immergiti

Bari Sardo: what to see

La Torre
Arte Sacra
Archeologia
Street Art

Discover what to see in Bari Sardo. Explore the routes through art, monuments and archaeology in Ogliastra.

Of course, Bari Sardo is famous for its beaches and is also, given its location, an ideal crossroads for discovering the infinite wonders of Ogliastra.
But this territory is much more than its sea.
It is, in fact, the unexpected details, the sudden glimpses and the off-route detours that make up the best memories of a holiday.
Perhaps it is that the beauty of travelling predisposes us to the pleasure of discovery, and we happily encounter the unexpected.
Here, then, are some useful pointers to help you find your way around an area full of surprises that, for a moment, will make you forget the wonder of its beaches.

The Spanish Tower

Dove dormire
Dove mangiare
vai alla mappa

One cannot tell the story of Bari Sardo without talking about its most identifying symbol: the Tower (la Torre). This now iconic place has been a fixed point in the imagination of this coastline for almost 500 years.
Slender towards the sky, the tower projects itself towards the horizon and looks far into the distance. A place of the soul for the local community, it guards the shoreline, conveying security and tranquillity.
It was built at the end of the 16th century, a period of Spanish rule in Sardinia, on the orders of the captain of Iglesias, Marco Antonio Camos. He had identified this site as being too heavily frequented by Saracen pirates.

It was then built on a stretch of coastline, known to sailors as Punta Nera. This site provided a visual connection with two other towers: Capo Bellavista to the north and San Giovanni di Sarrala to the south.
From the 5th to the 19th century, Sardinia was, in fact, equipped with an articulated sighting system that provided for the erection of towers communicating with one another along its entire perimeter. Communications thus took place through a pre-established code using light and sound signals.
Today, it is possible to rediscover this enormous historical and scenic heritage through the famous 100 Towers Walk—1284 kilometres, divided into eight stages, winding through trekking, hiking, camping and cycling routes.

The Tower had an additional defence function. It was constantly guarded by a commander, an artilleryman and two soldiers, who had at their disposal seven rifles, a pusher and no less than two cannons still preserved at the foot of the building.
The scene of violent battles and witness to a stormy past, today the Torre di Barì has become one of the most photographed places on the coast and an evocative setting for music festivals, theatre, and augmented reality shows.
A destination for relaxing evening strolls, it provides a scenic backdrop to a breathtaking panorama at night.

Expand your perspective in 360°

Immergiti

Archaeological Sites

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Contemplating the horizon has always been a vital necessity for coastal dwellers. The sea, a point of contact with the unknown, could be a sudden bearer of misfortune. A community’s fate and fortune were linked to its observation.
Therefore, the construction of towers, privileged places for observation, has interested this territory for millennia. The nuraghi, the archaic stone towers that dot Sardinia, in fact, mark the entire territory, dominating the heights.
To reach a nuraghe means, in most cases, to look out onto infinite panoramas, capable of freeing the gaze towards boundless trajectories.

There are 15 nuraghi in the territory of Bari Sardo, seven on the Teccu plateau alone. Two are easily accessible: the Sellersu nuraghe and the Iba Manna nuraghe.
They are perfect examples of how these points were chosen with expert precision. Perched like sentinels on the ridges of the plateau, they offer a breathtaking view that embraces a large part of the Ogliastra coastline at once.
In summer, it is advisable to reach these sites during the cooler hours of the day so that you can enjoy a pleasant trek through the greenery or a silent sunset immersed in antiquity.

These places, inhabited since Neolithic times, still preserve the traces of a distant past and it is certainly the stones that guard them.
We are talking about the domus de janas, the so-called “fairy houses” (case delle fate), architectures in negative, carved into the rock, whose purpose was to accompany the deceased on their journey to the afterlife.
They date back to the pre-Nuragic period between the 5th and 3rd millennium BC. The best known are those of Funtana ‘e su Rettore, Iba Manna and Pitzu ‘e Monti. Visiting them is an evocative experience and it is striking how such simple forms of architecture are able to exude a deeply sacred atmosphere.

Expand your perspective in 360°

Immergiti

Archaeological Sites

Dove dormire
Dove mangiare
vai alla mappa

Contemplating the horizon has always been a vital necessity for coastal dwellers. The sea, a point of contact with the unknown, could be a sudden bearer of misfortune. A community’s fate and fortune were linked to its observation.
Therefore, the construction of towers, privileged places for observation, has interested this territory for millennia. The nuraghi, the archaic stone towers that dot Sardinia, in fact, mark the entire territory, dominating the heights.
To reach a nuraghe means, in most cases, to look out onto infinite panoramas, capable of freeing the gaze towards boundless trajectories.

There are 15 nuraghi in the territory of Bari Sardo, seven on the Teccu plateau alone. Two are easily accessible: the Sellersu nuraghe and the Iba Manna nuraghe.
They are perfect examples of how these points were chosen with expert precision. Perched like sentinels on the ridges of the plateau, they offer a breathtaking view that embraces a large part of the Ogliastra coastline at once.
In summer, it is advisable to reach these sites during the cooler hours of the day so that you can enjoy a pleasant trek through the greenery or a silent sunset immersed in antiquity.

These places, inhabited since Neolithic times, still preserve the traces of a distant past and it is certainly the stones that guard them.
We are talking about the domus de janas, the so-called “fairy houses” (case delle fate), architectures in negative, carved into the rock, whose purpose was to accompany the deceased on their journey to the afterlife.
They date back to the pre-Nuragic period between the 5th and 3rd millennium BC. The best known are those of Funtana ‘e su Rettore, Iba Manna and Pitzu ‘e Monti. Visiting them is an evocative experience and it is striking how such simple forms of architecture are able to exude a deeply sacred atmosphere.

Expand your perspective in 360°

Immergiti

Archaeological Sites

Dove dormire
Dove mangiare
vai alla mappa

Contemplating the horizon has always been a vital necessity for coastal dwellers. The sea, a point of contact with the unknown, could be a sudden bearer of misfortune. A community’s fate and fortune were linked to its observation.
Therefore, the construction of towers, privileged places for observation, has interested this territory for millennia. The nuraghi, the archaic stone towers that dot Sardinia, in fact, mark the entire territory, dominating the heights.
To reach a nuraghe means, in most cases, to look out onto infinite panoramas, capable of freeing the gaze towards boundless trajectories.

There are 15 nuraghi in the territory of Bari Sardo, seven on the Teccu plateau alone. Two are easily accessible: the Sellersu nuraghe and the Iba Manna nuraghe.
They are perfect examples of how these points were chosen with expert precision. Perched like sentinels on the ridges of the plateau, they offer a breathtaking view that embraces a large part of the Ogliastra coastline at once.
In summer, it is advisable to reach these sites during the cooler hours of the day so that you can enjoy a pleasant trek through the greenery or a silent sunset immersed in antiquity.

These places, inhabited since Neolithic times, still preserve the traces of a distant past and it is certainly the stones that guard them.
We are talking about the domus de janas, the so-called “fairy houses” (case delle fate), architectures in negative, carved into the rock, whose purpose was to accompany the deceased on their journey to the afterlife.
They date back to the pre-Nuragic period between the 5th and 3rd millennium BC. The best known are those of Funtana ‘e su Rettore, Iba Manna and Pitzu ‘e Monti. Visiting them is an evocative experience and it is striking how such simple forms of architecture are able to exude a deeply sacred atmosphere.

Expand your perspective in 360°

Immergiti

Sacred Art and Architecture

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Although outwardly it may appear very simple, the façade of the Church of the Blessed Virgin of Monserrato conceals a real treasure of rare complexity inside. Hidden in the heart of the village, it is considered a real jewel.
Completed in 1720, it most likely assumed its current title during the period of Spanish rule in Sardinia (16th-17th centuries). The conquerors were, in fact, devout worshippers of the Virgen Morenita of Montserrat.
We can say that the architecture of Ogliastra in the 18th century reached its peak with its construction, which is quite unusual given the size of the building in relation to the size of the town. Similarly, the imposing 35-metre bell tower dominates the historic centre and the quiet surrounding square.

This singular anomaly can be traced back to when, in the mid-18th century, the possibility that Bari Sardo might host the bishop’s seat of Ogliastra prompted the then rector Bernardo Pes to erect the majestic bell tower and decorate the interior of the church with an abundance of materials and refinement of details that were unique.
The most extraordinary element is, in fact, the richness of its interiors: precious marbles draw articulate polychrome patterns, a masterful expression of the Baroque style.

Examples of this are the magnificent high altar inspired by that of Cagliari cathedral and the two altars placed specularly at the ends of the transept: the altar of the Rosary in primis and the altar dedicated to the Holy Spirit. The compositional balance and the abundance of inlays leaves one speechless.

One is definitely The Inferno by painter Ciccio Massa. It is a splendid painting with an allegorical and grotesque flavour. It depicts an intricate and frightening tangle of demons and damned souls. Another extremely important work because it is considered, to date, the oldest painting preserved in Ogliastra, dated 1559, is a copy of Raphael’s Holy Family from which it takes characters and their positions. It differs from the original in that it pays less attention to chromatic details. The executor remains unknown to this day.
Another hidden gem in the heart of the historic centre is the Church of Santa Cecilia. Built in the 16th century, it was completely restored in 1973 by a group of students from Bologna. Subsequently, thanks to the efforts of an elderly woman from the village who has patiently tended the surrounding garden, this little church has been transformed into a small oasis of peace embellished with splendid orchids and countless other species of flora.

Expand your perspective in 360°

Immergiti

Sacred Art and Architecture

Dove dormire
Dove mangiare
vai alla mappa

Although outwardly it may appear very simple, the façade of the Church of the Blessed Virgin of Monserrato conceals a real treasure of rare complexity inside. Hidden in the heart of the village, it is considered a real jewel.
Completed in 1720, it most likely assumed its current title during the period of Spanish rule in Sardinia (16th-17th centuries). The conquerors were, in fact, devout worshippers of the Virgen Morenita of Montserrat.
We can say that the architecture of Ogliastra in the 18th century reached its peak with its construction, which is quite unusual given the size of the building in relation to the size of the town. Similarly, the imposing 35-metre bell tower dominates the historic centre and the quiet surrounding square.

This singular anomaly can be traced back to when, in the mid-18th century, the possibility that Bari Sardo might host the bishop’s seat of Ogliastra prompted the then rector Bernardo Pes to erect the majestic bell tower and decorate the interior of the church with an abundance of materials and refinement of details that were unique.
The most extraordinary element is, in fact, the richness of its interiors: precious marbles draw articulate polychrome patterns, a masterful expression of the Baroque style.
Examples of this are the magnificent high altar inspired by that of Cagliari cathedral and the two altars placed specularly at the ends of the transept: the altar of the Rosary in primis and the altar dedicated to the Holy Spirit. The compositional balance and the abundance of inlays leaves one speechless.

One is definitely The Inferno by painter Ciccio Massa. It is a splendid painting with an allegorical and grotesque flavour. It depicts an intricate and frightening tangle of demons and damned souls. Another extremely important work because it is considered, to date, the oldest painting preserved in Ogliastra, dated 1559, is a copy of Raphael’s Holy Family from which it takes characters and their positions. It differs from the original in that it pays less attention to chromatic details. The executor remains unknown to this day.
Another hidden gem in the heart of the historic centre is the Church of Santa Cecilia. Built in the 16th century, it was completely restored in 1973 by a group of students from Bologna. Subsequently, thanks to the efforts of an elderly woman from the village who has patiently tended the surrounding garden, this little church has been transformed into a small oasis of peace embellished with splendid orchids and countless other species of flora.

Expand your perspective in 360°

Immergiti

Sacred Art and Architecture

Dove dormire
Dove mangiare
vai alla mappa

Although outwardly it may appear very simple, the façade of the Church of the Blessed Virgin of Monserrato conceals a real treasure of rare complexity inside. Hidden in the heart of the village, it is considered a real jewel.
Completed in 1720, it most likely assumed its current title during the period of Spanish rule in Sardinia (16th-17th centuries). The conquerors were, in fact, devout worshippers of the Virgen Morenita of Montserrat.
We can say that the architecture of Ogliastra in the 18th century reached its peak with its construction, which is quite unusual given the size of the building in relation to the size of the town. Similarly, the imposing 35-metre bell tower dominates the historic centre and the quiet surrounding square.

This singular anomaly can be traced back to when, in the mid-18th century, the possibility that Bari Sardo might host the bishop’s seat of Ogliastra prompted the then rector Bernardo Pes to erect the majestic bell tower and decorate the interior of the church with an abundance of materials and refinement of details that were unique.
The most extraordinary element is, in fact, the richness of its interiors: precious marbles draw articulate polychrome patterns, a masterful expression of the Baroque style.
Examples of this are the magnificent high altar inspired by that of Cagliari cathedral and the two altars placed specularly at the ends of the transept: the altar of the Rosary in primis and the altar dedicated to the Holy Spirit. The compositional balance and the abundance of inlays leaves one speechless.

One is definitely The Inferno by painter Ciccio Massa. It is a splendid painting with an allegorical and grotesque flavour. It depicts an intricate and frightening tangle of demons and damned souls. Another extremely important work because it is considered, to date, the oldest painting preserved in Ogliastra, dated 1559, is a copy of Raphael’s Holy Family from which it takes characters and their positions. It differs from the original in that it pays less attention to chromatic details. The executor remains unknown to this day.
Another hidden gem in the heart of the historic centre is the Church of Santa Cecilia. Built in the 16th century, it was completely restored in 1973 by a group of students from Bologna. Subsequently, thanks to the efforts of an elderly woman from the village who has patiently tended the surrounding garden, this little church has been transformed into a small oasis of peace embellished with splendid orchids and countless other species of flora.

Expand your perspective in 360°

Immergiti

Murals and Street Art

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Never before has art been such a key tool for understanding the world. Art is a description of identity and vice versa, a tale of otherness.
The global and the local constantly touch each other, confronting us with endless narratives and the difficult challenge of reconciling the past and the future without fuelling rifts.
Here it becomes necessary to identify a pivotal element on which to base this meeting. One above all: respect.

This is the theme chosen as the thread running through the works created by eight national and international artists on the walls of the houses in Bari Sardo.
The artists are Bastardilla, Crisa, Paola Corrias, Ericailcane, Daniele Gregorini, Marcello Marinelli, Marco Rea and Skan, and through their works they oblige us to necessarily take time to reflect.
The aim is to break the frames and use the streets of the village as a canvas, laying out a path composed of continuous and unexpected encounters between the old and the new.

Murals from the agro-pastoral tradition and bold, visionary street art works sprout up among ancient country churches such as those of St Cecilia and St Leonard and give us unexpected appearances.
In the same way do the irreverent works of Amico Paura, an artist from Ogliastra, who invites us through the art of paradox and estrangement to look at the world from another possible perspective with the intention of finding the one that is probably more just.

Expand your perspective in 360°

Immergiti

Murales & Street Art 

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Dove mangiare
vai alla mappa

Never before has art been such a key tool for understanding the world. Art is a description of identity and vice versa, a tale of otherness.
The global and the local constantly touch each other, confronting us with endless narratives and the difficult challenge of reconciling the past and the future without fuelling rifts.
Here it becomes necessary to identify a pivotal element on which to base this meeting. One above all: respect.

This is the theme chosen as the thread running through the works created by eight national and international artists on the walls of the houses in Bari Sardo.
The artists are Bastardilla, Crisa, Paola Corrias, Ericailcane, Daniele Gregorini, Marcello Marinelli, Marco Rea and Skan, and through their works they oblige us to necessarily take time to reflect.
The aim is to break the frames and use the streets of the village as a canvas, laying out a path composed of continuous and unexpected encounters between the old and the new.

Murals from the agro-pastoral tradition and bold, visionary street art works sprout up among ancient country churches such as those of St Cecilia and St Leonard and give us unexpected appearances.
In the same way do the irreverent works of Amico Paura, an artist from Ogliastra, who invites us through the art of paradox and estrangement to look at the world from another possible perspective with the intention of finding the one that is probably more just.

Expand your perspective in 360°

Immergiti

Murales & Street Art 

Dove dormire
Dove mangiare
vai alla mappa

Never before has art been such a key tool for understanding the world. Art is a description of identity and vice versa, a tale of otherness.
The global and the local constantly touch each other, confronting us with endless narratives and the difficult challenge of reconciling the past and the future without fuelling rifts.
Here it becomes necessary to identify a pivotal element on which to base this meeting. One above all: respect.

This is the theme chosen as the thread running through the works created by eight national and international artists on the walls of the houses in Bari Sardo.
The artists are Bastardilla, Crisa, Paola Corrias, Ericailcane, Daniele Gregorini, Marcello Marinelli, Marco Rea and Skan, and through their works they oblige us to necessarily take time to reflect.
The aim is to break the frames and use the streets of the village as a canvas, laying out a path composed of continuous and unexpected encounters between the old and the new.

Murals from the agro-pastoral tradition and bold, visionary street art works sprout up among ancient country churches such as those of St Cecilia and St Leonard and give us unexpected appearances.
In the same way do the irreverent works of Amico Paura, an artist from Ogliastra, who invites us through the art of paradox and estrangement to look at the world from another possible perspective with the intention of finding the one that is probably more just.

Expand your perspective in 360°

Immergiti
Things to do